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20121027
20121104
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CSPAN 9
CSPAN2 8
WMPT (PBS) 1
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English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
by religion? >> i am episcapalian. my husband is a cathlic, my children are catholics. we raise our children as catholics. i am happy to talk about my view on abortion. it is that it should be safe, legal, and rare. i've worked hard on the rare part, because i wanted to make sure this is not just something that divides us politically, and that i would work to make sure we reduce the number of unintended pregnancies and helped unemployed men and women get a job. i work with an organization that does research and now has the beginning evidence to show that we have reduced the number of abortions in iowa by 26% and unintended pregnancies by 8%. i have been in washington talking about the results of this and we hope that this will be a model for the nation. we won't have to talk about abortion if we make sure that people have access to contraceptives. i would like congressman king to explain what his view is on that. he has said that -- i would like to know if he believes that women in this community have the right to -- the legal right to go into the drugstore with a prescription for birth cont
heretical they couldn't even imagine really the key not it is a common religion. the father of bashar al-assad had a muslim religious practice in order to become president of syria. they are quite far apart. but they share common ideology. syria has supported iran during the iran-iraq war because they hated iraq at that time. syria and iran share anti-americanism and the israeli attitude don't want a domination of architecture in terms of security of the region. so that's the shia crescent. the second is a growing sunni crescent but they still lack the pinch. this is saudi arabia's game. the crescent goes from libya for each of i'm too jourdan through the southern part of the western part of iraq and onto saudi arabia and down to the coast that i called the oil gold coast. we see selassie fighters, moving from libya and across saudi arabia, to iraq and into syria increasingly to join the victorian water. the opposition in syria is increasingly being joined by these extremist forces, which is one of the reasons it's so difficult for us to support them. saudi arabia and qatar are providing
but it's not all about religion. but it's about the complicated layers which makes up the region. the question about iraq, can it or will it regain? is already there. part of the problem in terms of what the government in baghdad is trying to do, it doesn't matter if it's malik your anybody else. he believes in a strong central government. certainly stronger than the constitution which is very weak. and was written by shia and kurds who said never again to a strong central government. but you have a government that functions that can protect the country inhabit as weak as it is and not be able to defend its borders and to project national power. so there are people, and the indy i surveyed that was a pulitzer but that was published in april or may says that maliki, love him or him from a certain more popular than he was six months ago. and his popular including among the sunnis and others who see him, not the election, they, they don't have to like them, it's not a popular to contest. i think the iraqis know that. but they don't know who else is there, and he has taken strong mov
to bordeaux and saying to people, 'i've got a great new religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine.' >> the task, to put on a suit and tie, and climb on your bicycle -- >> the tried and true and well worn method was knocking on doors. and so we knocked on thousands and thousands and thousands of doors. >> the mormon mission does teach you to deal with rejection. most people are not thrilled to see a pair of mormon missionaries on their door. >> and it means cultivating your own inner spiritual life. where else are you going to get the resources and the strength to carry on this difficult work unless you feel like god is with you? >> then a life changing moment. >> mitt romney is driving. they are coming around a curve in this small remote town. there are six people in the car. >> he went around the bend and he saw that there was a, at a high rate of speed, another person coming right towards him. >> one of the policemen who had shown up as the first responder, if you will, had actually written in his passport 'il est mort,' which means 'he is dead.' >> mitt woke up in a ward, and h
religion. >> i'm not catholic. i am an episcopalian. i cannot answer that question. my husband is a catholic. we have raised our children as catholics. i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. it should be safe, legal, and repair. >> here is a valid point that is constructed. we have babies in america and i would that are being aborted simply because they are little baby girls, because the mother wants a boy instead of a girl. we have legislation before congress that prohibits sex selective abortion. she thinks it is ridiculous to talk about it. i think it matters to the little girls are being aborted. >> election day is one week away. >> i like watching the gavel-to- gavel coverage. it is the only place to get the real deal. i also enjoy news makers and the book programs. i like that the commentary is only intended to let you know what is going on. there is not too much analysis. opinion.rtainly is i appreciate all i can see through it and understand ithe programming itself. i can get my analysis elsewhere. if you want to see how your government works directly, c- s
interference, without pressure, without political interference. that's their role in that religion. in iran, they see a challenge to the legitimacy of the oversight of that. it's a governance issue. it's not a sunni shia issue. and with iran's government, d.c. essentially death by 1000 razor cuts as iran has a coherent strategy for destabilization in the region, starting in baghdad, extends to damascus. hamas, muslim brotherhood and yemen, bahrain, the eastern province, wherever they can take an issue and turn it into a sectarian issue, that is the strategy that they see that iran is pursuing. so he ran as a very real threat to them. it's the existential threat in the region. >> thank you, mr. ambassador for enlightening us in this opening session of the second day of his 21st annual comp trends of u.s. policy issues. [applause] >> next we have a relative newcomer to the annual forums in the sands of the new league of arab states chief representative ambassador to the united states. i've known each one of them for the last almost half-century and each one of them brings to the cars in the t
a question. as a catholic, how has your view on abortion been shaped by your religion? >> i am not catholic. i am an episcopalian. i cannot answer that question. my husband is a catholic. my children are catholic. my grandchildren have just been baptized in a catholic church. we raise our children as catholics. i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. my view on abortion is that it should be safe, legal, and rare. >> here is a point that is constructive and a difference between us. we have babies and america and in iowa that are being avoided simply because they are baby girls, because the mother wants a baby boy instead of a baby girl. we have evidence. we have legislation before congress that prohibits sex- selective abortions. i think it matters. it matters to the little girls who are being aborted. >> election day is one week away. find a key house senate races across the country on c-span, c- span radio, and c-span.org. >> now, a look at color model as a battleground state in the 2012 election. an update on the presidential race in that state. this is 25 minutes. host: all t
, as a catholic, how has your view on abortion been shaped by religion? >> i am episcapalian. my husband is a cathlic, my children are catholics. we raise our children as catholics. i am happy to talk about my view on abortion. it is that it should be safe, legal, and rare. i've worked hard on the rare part, because i wanted to make sure this is not just something that divides us politically, and that i would work to make sure we reduce the number of unintended pregnancies and helped unemployed men and women get a job. i work with an organization that does research and now has the beginning evidence to show that we have reduced the number of abortions in iowa by 26% and unintended pregnancies by 8%. i have been in washington talking about the results of this and we hope that this will be a model for the nation. about't have to talk abortion if we make sure that people have access to contraceptives. i would like congressman king to explain what his view is on that. he has said that -- i would like to know if he believes that women in this community have the right to -- the legal right to
for it. why should i pay for their birth control? it is against my faith. i have the freedom of religion and plan to exercise that by voting for romney. host: kathy sullivan. guest: in the first place, no one is proposing that taxpayers pay for someone's birth control. the issue is whether or not the employer has the right to discriminate against certain types of prescriptions, specifically birth control. this is a law we have had in new hampshire for several years now that employers have to cover prescription contraceptive. it has worked quite well. it has nothing to do with the tax payer. it is the expense of the employer, not the taxpayer. with respect to the health-care issue, i have to tell you something, i am the managing partner of a law firm. we have about 50 people who work there. up until couple of years ago, our health and -- health insurance premiums went up by double-digit numbers. for years. last year our health care premiums will have gone up by only 3% total for two years, which is unheard of several years ago. we kept looking at the double- digit percentage increases. i
in iowa. the issue of romney's religion is an issue i raised with him when he ran a pull your years ago and its initial history sensitive about man does not like to talk about. iowa republicans are dominated by evangelical christians. they are a bit leery of mormons. they don't understand it. they don't like to talk about it. no one will say i am not excited about mitt romney because he's a mormon, but they are aware of it. so that is an issue. it goes more to not whether someone will support mitt romney or not support mitt romney but the enthusiasm level they will bring the campaign. that diminishes it just a bit. so that's an issue. if you look at how the campaign plays out, i think that will be one of the majoridin fas this ectionwhich i thk is very cl and that is the enthusiasm level that each candidate can bring to the game. can mitt romney excite the republican base, which is largely evangelical christians in iowa? can barack obama excite the democratic base? he has a challen to excite voters in certain parts of the state. i think he has an edge because the democratic base is ki
really looking at it as a common religion. they are quite far along. syria and iran share americanism and the anti-israeli attitude. they share a common front. the shia crescent is there. and the growing [inaudible] the crescent goes from libya through egypt through georgia and the western part of iran and saudi arabia and the coast. moving across saudi arabia. increasingly the joint of sectarian war. the optimism in syria is increasingly being joined by these extremists. it is one of the reasons for supporting bad, saudi arabia is providing small arms. and we have to ask ourselves, what kind of extremism is coming out of that? >> we also have a situation of that which is maintained by russia. again, that group -- it goes back again. all relationships between russia and syria. they are both against the security council and it has to do with a great power in war over there. there is the issue of what issue is that that they are actually supporting? i have a syrian contact that i talked to a couple of days and he said syria? we think of ourselves as [inaudible] , but we do not know what
for their birth control? it is against my faith. i have the freedom of religion and plan to exercise that by voting for romney. host: kathy sullivan. guest: in the first place, no one is proposing that taxpayers pay for someone's birth control. the issue is whether or not the employer has the right to discriminate against certain types of prescriptions, specifically birth control. this is a law we have had in new hampshire for several years now that employers have to cover prescription contraceptive. it has worked quite well. it has nothing to do with the tax payer. it is the expense of the employer, not the taxpayer. with respect to the health-care issue, i have to tell you something, i am the managing partner of a law firm. we have about 50 people who work there. up until couple of years ago, our health and -- health insurance premiums went up by double-digit numbers. for years. last year our health care premiums will have gone up by only 3% total for two years, which is unheard of several years ago. we kept looking at the double- digit percentage increases. i am very happy with wh
with china. we didn't have diplomatic religion. no concrete exchange. mostly balancing the soviet union during the cold war and talking in strategic terms about global affairs. in the '90s we began to pick up concrete exchanges and i was fortunate in to be china and increase trade and sellings arms to china cooperating in afghanistan and along the soviet border. but then along came [inaudible] so in the '90s the relationship had to adjust to two new dramatic element. the glue that held us together in the '70s and '80s. it was gone. the cold war was over. in a healthy way, e with had to greatly expand our relationship with china. but at the same time because of [inaudible] the human right issue got more prominent, and it was much more difficult to deal with china in terms of domestic politic. the '90s was a matter of dick and myself trying to struggle to how we can get the relationship on a broader basis and increase the exchanges. by the time we get to 2000 china is becoming a major power in the world and our interactions become in chris' and your turn much more extension and healthy an
recounts his life in fractalist. in of africa, africa's culture, religion, history and identity. look for these titles in bookstores this coming we can watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> could have wanted more but in the conference can only do so much so want diversity. you want democrats, republicans, different parts of the country. everyone at different ages. we knew on the basis of nine, you can't make generalizations that are 100% certain. we may say as much in the book because conclusions are hypothesis that other people might run with but in order to make those hypotheses we needed a fairly diverse group. >> we also have the white house project for the last couple election cycles and several of the women identified several years before the 2008 election, kathleen sibelius, both in there, and barbara lee has been here several years from now when you did the last round with her foundation and talked about looking at women governors. we wanted to look at women governors who had been through barbara lee's training through the pipeline. we also m
catholic in religion. certainly not all of them, and pro-union. these, steve, are the quintessential reagan democrats. and they would be in counties adjacent to pittsburgh like beaver and westmoreland and washington and greene and further to the east cambria and fayette. of late those counties have a propensity to vote republican particularly in big elections. they are culturally conservative, pro-gun, pro-life, not particularly fond of gay rights. then if you think of pennsylvania and draw, and draw a big t up the center of the state and fan out across the new york border, not quite getting to erie and not quite getting to the northeastern part of the state, just a big t, that's the conservative blue area of the state. it's basically white, it's protestant, it doesn't have a definable ethnic group particularly. once you get east of the susquehanna river with the exception of a few counties, the demography changes sharply. let's go down to the southeast, philadelphia heavily democratic. but the four suburban ring counties, bucks, montgomery, chester and delaware, are the swing counties. two
that i thought was guaranteed under the constitution, the practice of your religion, that now there has to be an amendment put forward to bring that about. if the law was never passed, the lawsuit wouldn't be in place, and religious freedom, today, would not be in question. >> moderator: continuing with rebuttals, mr. horning, 30 seconds. horning: there's a lot of misunderstanding, and there's no real winning the issue. unfortunately, it's one of those that, you know, it's an outcome of something terrible happening sometimes, and it's dealing with life situation nobody wants. we can't do justice to it. as a federal legislature, i can't do justice to it. i would fail in what i would try to achieve. >> moderator: thank you. mr. donnelly? donnelly: my faith guided me on the issue, and i know their faiths have guided my friends who are up here as well. we have a program in my town called the women's care center. what they do is provide a positiontive alternative. for women who are pregnant, there's an opportunity for a place to live, a place to be cared for, and for somebody to know there's
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)